They call it a non-tropical disturbance. And it’s bringing extreme weather to Florida

How to survive if you get caught in a rip current

Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water. Rip currents account for 80% of beach rescues, and can be dangerous or deadly if you don’t know what to do. This video shows you how to break the grip of the rip.

Rip currents are powerful, narrow channels of fast-moving water. Rip currents account for 80% of beach rescues, and can be dangerous or deadly if you don’t know what to do. This video shows you how to break the grip of the rip.

Meteorologists are tracking a “strange” disturbance across the Southeast Bahamas that could bring rain and record heat to South Florida by Thursday.

CBS4 meteorologist Lissette Gonzalez said the non-tropical disturbance, a low pressure system off Florida’s east coast, “has plenty of moisture associated with it and as it moves closer to us late week, the rain chance increases Thursday and Friday.”

The National Weather Service in Miami pegs rain and thunderstorm chances at 50 percent Thursday night into Friday.

Summer heat

Another perhaps unwelcome, unseasonal guest? Summer heat, with a forecast high of 92 degrees on Saturday and Sunday.

Broiling.

But before we get there, Tuesday morning saw some showers in parts of South Florida like Lauderdale-by-the-Sea, Tamarac, Key Biscayne, Miami Beach and Islamorada and Tavernier in the Keys.

The National Weather Service in Key West predicts winds will increase Tuesday and Wednesday with seas at three to five feet in Hawk Channel and six to nine feet in the Florida Straits.

Got a little boat? There’s a small craft advisory in the Keys.

Comfy temperatures, however, in the mid-to-upper 70s, with Marathon the warmest at 90 degrees, Gonzalez said.

Rip current risk

On Tuesday, the National Weather Service in Miami issued a “life-threatening” high rip current risk, which will remain in effect through Wednesday evening thanks to strengthening east winds.

Swimmers should take heed. Boating conditions will also turn hazardous across coastal Atlantic waters.

Should you swim, pay attention to lifeguards, swim near their stations, and if you get caught in a current of water pulling you away from the shore don’t fight the flow.

Instead, swim in a direction following the shoreline and if you can’t break free face the shore and call or wave for help, the weather service suggests.